Poster

‘Camps That Are Becoming Cities – Cities That Are Becoming Camps: The Case of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon and Jordan

The Oppenheimer Chair is pleased to welcome Faten Kikano, PhD Candidate in Environmental Design, from the Université de Montréal for a conference and a photo exhibition. Ms. Kikano will present her research and her photos about the life of  Syrian refugees in camps in Lebanon and Jordan. Join us for a lunch, a short conference…
Sonia Cancian Poster
Monday, 27 March 2017

The Power of Life Stories: Situating the Narratives of Migrants and Refugees within the Context of the Law

The Oppenheimer Chair and the McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism are pleased to welcome Dr. Sonia Cancian, from Zayed University for a seminar on life stories of migrants and refugees and the law. This seminar will lead a discussion on life stories of migrants and refugees and their power (or not) within…

Event: Migration and the Transnational Family: Transnational Households, Care and the Right to Family Life

27 October, 2018

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Monday, November 19, 2018 from 1pm to 2:30pm. McGill University Faculty of Law, NCDH 316.

LUNCH IS INCLUDED.

This presentation will focus on reconsidering inherited assumptions about parenthood, household and the concept of care during times of prolonged parent-child separation. The migration of Central and Eastern European parents in the domestic care sector of Europe has allowed for the development of a unique system of transnational welfare between home and host societies. Across the globe, transnational family life takes place at the intersection of various legal, policy and market regimes, requiring that the boundaries of family law and migration law be redrawn. Examining this issue in the European sphere allows for a unique perspective as EU regulation and jurisprudence attempts to balance competing interests of the right to free movement and the right to family life. Going forward the framework developed in the dissertation allows for much needed comparative analysis with transnational family life outside of the transnational space of the European Union. Further exploration of the lived experience of mobile families within in and beyond the EU will carry valuable lessons and lead to useful analytical approaches for both theory and practice.

About the Presenter:
Dr. Edit Frenyó’s teaching and research experience revolve around the areas of Transnational Family Law, Migration Studies, Human Rights and Children’s Rights. After having completed her undergraduate legal studies with distinction at the University of Szeged’s Faculty of Law, she practiced civil law as a full time notarial clerk in Budapest, Hungary. Ms. Frenyó earned an LL.M. at Boston College Law School in 2010, where she spent the subsequent year as a visiting scholar/teaching assistant, co-developing and -teaching a new course, International Human Rights: Semester in Practice. She earned her S.J.D at Georgetown University Law Center, where she applied perspectives of law and the social sciences in her doctoral research, to explore the contemporary phenomena of transnational families.

 

Event: Statelessness in ASEAN: Causes and Responses to a Protracted Problem

27 October, 2018

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Monday, November 12, 2018 from 1pm to 2:30pm. McGill University Faculty of Law, NCDH 202

LUNCH INCLUDED.

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates that at least 10 million people around the world are not considered a national by any state. Around 40 per cent of the identified stateless population of the world live in the Asia Pacific region. Southeast Asia and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) harbour some of the largest stateless populations in Asia. The presentation takes stock of ASEAN and its member states’ stance on statelessness. It first maps some of the predominant causes of statelessness, and then provides an overview of ASEAN member states’ responses to statelessness. It concludes with a discussion of the lessons that could be drawn from these responses for future action to address statelessness in the region.

About the Presenter:
Dr. Rodziana Mohamed Razali has researched statelessness since 2013 and completed her PhD at the National University of Malaysia in 2016. Her thesis is entitled “Protection against Statelessness at Birth: International and Domestic Legal Frameworks of ASEAN Member States with a Special Case Study on Kota Kinabalu, Sabah”. She was previously in the Malaysian Judicial and Legal Service before leaving for her Masters of Laws at the University of Melbourne. She is now a senior lecturer at the Islamic Science University of Malaysia, an Advocate and Solicitor of the High Court of Malaya (Non-practicing) and a member of Statelessness Network Asia Pacific (SNAP). From 2018-19, she is attached to the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism, McGill University as a Steinberg Post-Doctoral Fellow in International Migration Law researching birth registration and legal identity.

Diversity Statement: Changing our Mindset and Understanding the Complexity of Migration

27 August, 2018

4407-CREPEAU-OEStatement by François Crépeau (former United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants) in response to Ayelet Shachar‘s opening question at the Second Annual Goethe-Göttingen Critical Exchange Roundtable Discussion. Shahar’s opening question was: “What in your opinion, are the biggest challenges we currently face in the context of migration? How are legal institutions and other social actors – local, national, regional, transnational, or international – helping to understand and address them?”

The roundtable was chaired and moderated by Prof. Ayelet Shachar and the event was co-organized with Prof. Rainer Forst of the Normative Orders Cluster of Excellence at Goethe University Frankfurt/Main.

1. Changing our mindset: overcoming stereotypes

The biggest challenge is to change our mindset regarding migration, to change how we represent migrants.

Our most common assumptions regarding migration are too often based on stereotypes, myths and fantasies regarding the “radical difference” of the migrants.

This is most visible when we talk about “our people” migrating:  we call them “expats” or “tourists” or “executives” or “retirees”. We very rarely describe mobile people from the Global North – or even the elite 1% of the Global South – as “migrants”.

Fear of the “mobile other” seems a common thread of all settled societies throughout history, including the invention of the despised “asylum seeker” around 1982, in order to distinguish them from the good refugees who waited patiently in camps to be picked and chosen, or not.

Because of this fear, we need to remember the former kinds of migrants when we speak about migrants in a precarious situation: asylum seekers, undocumented migrants and temporary migrant workers.

Migration is in our DNA. It is a normal human behaviour. We are almost all migrants or immediate descendants of migrants. Settlement is often only generational.

To access the statement, please click here.

Five myths about the refugee crisis

The cameras have gone – but the suffering endures. Daniel Trilling deconstructs the beliefs that still shape policy and public opinion
5 June, 2018

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Myth 1: The crisis is over

The refugee crisis that dominated the news in 2015 and 2016 consisted primarily of a sharp rise in the number of people coming to Europe to claim asylum. Arrivals have now dropped, and governments have cracked down on the movement of undocumented migrants within the EU; many thousands are stuck in reception centres or camps in southern Europe, while others try to make new lives in the places they have settled.

But to see the crisis as an event that began in 2015 and ended the following year is a mistake, because it obscures the fact that the underlying causes have not changed. To see it in those terms only gives the impression of a hitherto unsullied Europe, visited by hordes of foreigners it has little to do with. This is misleading. The disaster of recent years has as much to do with immigration policies drawn up in European capitals as it does with events outside the continent, and the crisis also consists of overreaction and panic, fuelled by a series of misconceptions about who the migrants are, why they come, and what it means for Europe.

To read the full article, please click here.

 

Our World’s Refugees

Interview with Professor François Crépeau in ThoughtEconomics
14 April, 2018
François Crépeau: Migration is the result of push and pull factors. We as a species always go from a place of trouble or lack of resources, to a place with less trouble and more resources. It is what we have always done, how we have prospered on this planet. We often talk about push factors such as violence and poverty, but the biggest reason for migration is jobs. People think about migration for work as being from the ‘poor South’ to the ‘rich North’, but we all migrate, we travel, and we do so not because of poverty, deprivation or violence. We all migrate. We talk about migrants as if migration from the North  does not exist, and that’s only true because, in the North, migrants do not like to be called “migrants”: they prefer to be called expats, students or retirees. We talk often about push factors, but the major pull factor, jobs, is rarely talk about. People move to where they can establish themselves, create economic and social conditions conducive to having a family, and creating a future for one’s children. This is what we all want.

 

To access the full article, please click here