The Development of a Common EU Migration Policy and the Rights of Irregular Migrants: A Progress Narrative?

Academic Article by Alan Desmond
26 May, 2016

Please see this article by Alan Desmond:

“The inadequacy of European Union (EU) efforts to address the particular vulnerability to rights abuses faced by irregular migrants has become an article of faith for academics, activists and practitioners involved in the field of EU migration policy. This inadequacy is thrown into sharp relief by the efforts expended by the EU to prevent and reduce irregular migration, and control migration more generally. However, despite the emphasis placed on migration control in the common EU migration policy which has developed since 1999, that same policy and the EU legal order more broadly contain the raw materials out of which a robust human rights protection framework for irregular migrants may be wrought. The entry into force of the Treaty of Lisbon in 2009 increases the chances of the practical realization of such a framework, the makings of which are already discernible in the recent jurisprudence of the Court of Justice of the European Union.”

To read the full article in PDF, please click here.

 

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships

Arnold & Blema Steinberg Post-Doctoral Fellowships in International Migration Law and Policy
3 April, 2016

The vision and generosity of the Steinberg Foundation is at the heart of this new and exciting Fellowship opportunity.  The Centre for Human Rights & Legal Pluralism of the Faculty of Law at McGill University is delighted to be able to offer two Postdoctoral Research Fellowships beginning in the 2016-2017 academic year.

The Postdoctoral Research Fellowships will be funded by the Arnold and Blema Steinberg Foundation and the appointment(s) shall be for an initial duration of one year with a possibility of renewal for one more year. The Postdoctoral Fellow(s) will work as part of a research team in collaboration with the Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law and the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism (CHRLP) under the leadership and supervision of Professor François Crépeau, Professor at the Faculty of Law, Director of the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism, and the U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants.

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A Human Rights and Ethical Lens on Security and Human Dignity: The Case Study of Syrian Asylum Seekers

by Francesca Vietti & Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo
1 April, 2016

Abstract
The article tackles the plural and evolving concepts of security by analysing their relation to human rights and ethics. Although the general impression is that seldom the security discourse is associated with the respect of human rights and ethics, at least from a theoretical point of view security is indeed intertwined with those normative features (first thesis). Moreover, ethics and human rights can be valuably and usefully employed to clarify issues related to security and eventually to suggest improvements in the political management of security issues (second thesis). We argue our theses by focusing on a case study of particular relevance to the present day debate on security: the Syrian asylum seekers headed to Europe. In our ethical and human rights enquiry into this case study we consider multiple aspects related to security (‘de jure’ or normative, ‘de facto’ and perceptive-societal) and the interpretative lens provided by ethics and human rights sheds light on the crucial and manifold centrality played by the notion of human dignity.

Click here to read the full article.

Click here to read the abstract of the article “Caught in the crossfire, the impact of foreign fighters on IDPs, refugees and asylum seekers” by Francesca Vietti and Mike Bisi, published in the book “Foreign Fighters under International Law and Beyond”.

 

International Summer School in Forced Migration

Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford
31 March, 2016

About the Summer School
The Summer School offers an intensive, interdisciplinary and participative approach to the study of forced migration. It aims to enable people working with refugees and other forced migrants to reflect critically on the forces and institutions that dominate the world of the displaced.

Now in its 27th year, the three-week course combines the very best of Oxford University’s academic excellence with a stimulating and participatory method of critical learning and reflection.

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