Photo Credit: Press TV - Israeli Settlements

A Venue for Justice or an Occupation Accomplice?

The Israeli High Court of Justice and the Israeli Settlements in the Occupied West Bank
2 October, 2017

The Center for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism and the Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law are pleased to present:

“A Venue for Justice or an Occupation Accomplice?: The Israeli High Court of Justice and the Israeli Settlements in the Occupied West Bank”

When: Friday October 13th, 13:00-14:30

Where: New Chancellor Day Hall, McGill Faculty of Law, room #609

This talk will provide an overview of how the Israeli Supreme Court of Justice (HCJ) has interpreted and applied principles of the international law of occupation in adjudicating petitions that were filed by Palestinians to challenge the legality of security based measures that were implemented for the alleged safety of Israeli settlements and settlers in the occupied West Bank after the outbreak of the Second Intifada (2000) .

The first element to consider is the extent to which the Court has provided Palestinian petitioners with a venue for an effective domestic remedy for alleged violations of their internationally protected rights. The research adopts the HCJ’s position that the international law of occupation is guided by an internal logic of balancing between the Occupant’s security requirements and the fundamental rights of the occupied population. It also espouses that this logic is reflected in the three normative principles underlying this body of law: stating that occupation is ‘temporary’, that it is a form of trust, and that it does not bestow sovereignty by the Occupant over the occupied territory. Hence, the second question that the research attempts to answer is whether the Court’s adjudication has promoted or undermined those principles.

Speaker Bio: Rouba Al-Salem has an undergraduate degree in International Relations from the American University in Cairo. Later, she obtained a Master of Arts in Middle East Politics from Exeter University (UK) and a Master of Law in Public International Law from the London School of Economics and Political Science (UK). In 2016, she graduated with a PhD in law from Montreal University’s faculty of law and is currently a postdoctoral (Steinberg) fellow in international migration rights and policy at the Center for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism (McGill) for the year (2017-2018). In the past, she has worked in and on human rights issues as they relate to the Middle East region, including for the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Moderator: Professor François Crépeau, Director, McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism

Coffee and Tea will be served. Please RSVP at oppenheimer@mcgill.ca

  Yannick Lécuyer, maître de conférences HDR à l’université d’Angers et collaborateur de la fondation René Cassin

Existe-t-il un ordre public européen?

Event: September 22, 13:00-14:30, Faculty of McGill
19 September, 2017

Existe-t-il un ordre public européen? Join the Center for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism at McGill and the Oppenheimer Chair this Friday for a conversation with Yannick Lécuyer, maître de conférences HDR à l’université d’Angers et collaborateur de la fondation René Cassin, to find out.

L’ordre public européen est l’ordre d’une Europe institutionnelle vouée intégralement à la protection de valeurs et de libertés fondamentales. Apparu à plusieurs reprises dans certains des arrêts les plus prestigieux rendus par la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme, la notion d’ordre public européen fait encore débat. Pour certains, elle est devenue le pivot du contentieux européen des droits de l’homme. Pour d’autres, elle est surévaluée et artificielle.

Coffee and Tea will be served. RSVP at oppenheimer@mcgill.ca

Location: New Chancellor Day Hall, McGill Faculty of Law, room #609

 

Is the World ready for Global Justice?

Conference of William A. Schabas, Frédéric Mégret, Nidal Jurdi and moderated by François Crépeau
7 September, 2017

The McGill Center for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism hereby invites you to its big conference of William A. Schabas moderated by François Crépeau and followed by a discussion with Frédéric Mégret and Nidal N. Jurdi.

As you know, 2017 is a very pivotal year for international criminal justice. It marks the 72nd anniversary of the establishment of the Nuremberg Military Tribunals, the 71st anniversary of the establishment of military tribunals in the Far East, a special year for the United Nations ad hoc tribunals in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda both of which are in a gradual completion of their respective mandates and without forgetting the anniversary of the entry into force of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.

15 years after the establishment of this judicial institution as a permanent body with a universal vocation operating under the new premise of complementarity to national jurisdictions, this tribunal is now at a crossroads: high-level state officials accused for having committed grave crimes continue to travel around the world, key witnesses are assassinated, charges have been dropped by the office of the prosecutor itself, preliminary examinations stagnate whenever the most powerful are concerned. In Syria, as well as in every situation where nationals of the permanent members of the Security Council or their allies are concerned, it is a total inactivity. Even where the judicial system seems to be moving forward, the immunities of heads of state on the one hand and, most seriously, immunities for heads of non-state parties on the other hand, have come to poison the procedure. On the African side, some states start slamming the door of the Court while building a relatively parallel system at a regional level.

In light of all these challenges in the institutionalization of the universality of international justice, seven decades after the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals, more than two decades after the creation of ad hoc tribunals and in view of all the challenges faced by the ICC in only 15 years of operation, the McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism organizes this timely conference that brings together different perspectives on this unique and topical theme: “Is the world ready for global justice?”

Date: September 14th 2017  from 10am-11:30 am 

Place: McGill Law Faculty, Moot Court Room. 

Postal Address: 3644, Peel Street (New-Chancellor-Day Hall), Montreal, Canada. 

Price: the event is free of charge but registration is mandatory (RSVP: chrlp.law@mcgill.ca) 

You can find the event description also on Facebook.

To access the Live Stream Video Recording, please click here

  Sonia Cancian Poster

The Power of Life Stories: Situating the Narratives of Migrants and Refugees within the Context of the Law

Conference by Sonia Cancian
27 March, 2017

The Oppenheimer Chair and the McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism are pleased to welcome Dr. Sonia Cancian, from Zayed University for a seminar on life stories of migrants and refugees and the law.

This seminar will lead a discussion on life stories of migrants and refugees and their power (or not) within the world of policy-making and the law.

“Life stories and the law are intrinsically connected. We witness this daily both on a micro- and macro-scale, whether at a client’s meeting with her/his lawyer, in the courtroom, in the creation of binding precedents, in the diffusion of social and legal awareness, and among countless other contexts, in the introduction and implementation of policies and laws. As we consider the recent immigration crisis culminating as I write, what becomes especially evident is that the narratives of migrants and refugees—much like their counter-narratives–shape, and are shaped by, social and political awareness and the creation of policy and laws. What kinds of stories of refugees and migrants are we talking about here? How do they influence the individual and the broader communities, and vice versa? In what ways do the stories give insight to the shaping of policies and laws?  And, how do policies influence the lives of migrants and refugees today and in the past?”

WhereRoom 312, New Chancellor Day Hall, Faculty of Law
When: March 29, 2017 from 1 to 2:30 pm

RSVP at oppenheimer@mcgill.ca

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  Poster

‘Camps That Are Becoming Cities – Cities That Are Becoming Camps: The Case of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon and Jordan

By Faten Kikano

The Oppenheimer Chair is pleased to welcome Faten Kikano, PhD Candidate in Environmental Design, from the Université de Montréal for a conference and a photo exhibition.

Ms. Kikano will present her research and her photos about the life of  Syrian refugees in camps in Lebanon and Jordan.

Join us for a lunch, a short conference and a commented tour of Ms. Kikano’s photos which will be exposed in the Atrium of the Faculty of Law.

Where: Room 608 of the New Chancellor Day Hall, Faculty of Law
When: March 24 from 1 to 2:30 pm 

RSVP at oppenheimer@mcgill.ca

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