Beyond the 2018 Global Compact for Migration

The Future of International Cooperation on Migration Governance - February 5th, 2020

 

 

The Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law and the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism at McGill university Faculty of Law, hosted a panel discussion on the future of the Global Compact for Migration, featuring :

  • His Excellency Ambassador Juan José Gómez Camacho, Ambassador of Mexico to Canada, former Permanent Representative of Mexico to the United Nations between 2016 and 2019 and
  • Hon. Luise Arbour, recently the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General on International Migration, a former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, and a former Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

The panel discussion was hosted and moderated by :

  • Pr François Crépeau is the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Lawand the Director of the McGill Center for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism. Pr Crépeau was the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants from 2011 to 2017.

According to the United Nations, the global number of international migrants reached 272 million in 2019. This figure will increase due to population growth, enhanced connectivity, trade, rising inequality, demographic imbalances and climate change. Migration provides immense opportunity and benefits for home and host communities. At the same time, due to poor regulation and exploitation, migration can also create significant challenges for states and individuals alike. The 2018 Global Compact for Migration is the first-ever United Nations instrument on a common approach to the governance of international migration in all its dimensions. Our distinguished panelists were both instrumental to the crafting and adoption of the Global Compact. Although non-binding, the Compact is grounded in the values of state sovereignty, responsibility sharing, non-discrimination and human rights. It recognizes that a cooperative approach is needed to optimize the overall benefits of migration, while addressing its challenges for individuals and communities in countries of origin, transit and destination.

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