‘This makes it impossible for individuals involved in immigration disputes to obtain their personal information from the Home Office.’ Photograph: © Patrick George/Alamy
  ‘This makes it impossible for individuals involved in immigration disputes to obtain their personal information from the Home Office.’ Photograph: © Patrick George/Alamy

New UK data protection rules are a cynical attack on immigrants

Article in The Guardian
12 February, 2018

Migrants are considered unworthy of the right to privacy. The fundamental idea at work here is that “security considerations” should always legitimately prevail over whatever privacy rights are recognised to foreigners in the international and European human rights framework. It hints at an interpretation through which human rights are effectively only citizens’ rights.

“But now a far more profound and deliberate line of attack is being adopted by the British government in its national immigration policy, under cover of implementing the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), one of the biggest modernisations of data protection law anywhere in the world. Simply put, a new clause in the government’s data protection bill, which implements the GDPR, would remove the rights of people who are subject to an immigration procedure to know what public authorities hold about them and to rectify or delete erroneous or unlawfully collected personal data…

This is an alarming development and anyone who understands immigration law or data protection will realise that this makes it impossible for individuals involved in immigration disputes to obtain their personal information from the Home Office, something which is essential to any administrative dispute. In addition, these measures would also potentially affect the 3 million EU citizens who will soon face new processes to register their residence after Brexit.”

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