Beyond the 2018 Global Compact for Migration

The Future of International Cooperation on Migration Governance - February 5th, 2020

 

 

The Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law and the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism at McGill university Faculty of Law, hosted a panel discussion on the future of the Global Compact for Migration, featuring :

  • His Excellency Ambassador Juan José Gómez Camacho, Ambassador of Mexico to Canada, former Permanent Representative of Mexico to the United Nations between 2016 and 2019 and
  • Hon. Luise Arbour, recently the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General on International Migration, a former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, and a former Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

The panel discussion was hosted and moderated by :

  • Pr François Crépeau is the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Lawand the Director of the McGill Center for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism. Pr Crépeau was the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants from 2011 to 2017.

According to the United Nations, the global number of international migrants reached 272 million in 2019. This figure will increase due to population growth, enhanced connectivity, trade, rising inequality, demographic imbalances and climate change. Migration provides immense opportunity and benefits for home and host communities. At the same time, due to poor regulation and exploitation, migration can also create significant challenges for states and individuals alike. The 2018 Global Compact for Migration is the first-ever United Nations instrument on a common approach to the governance of international migration in all its dimensions. Our distinguished panelists were both instrumental to the crafting and adoption of the Global Compact. Although non-binding, the Compact is grounded in the values of state sovereignty, responsibility sharing, non-discrimination and human rights. It recognizes that a cooperative approach is needed to optimize the overall benefits of migration, while addressing its challenges for individuals and communities in countries of origin, transit and destination.

 

A Month, a Year, a Decade ?

The Temporal Capacity of Protection for Refugees and Other Forced Migrants - Nov 11, 2019
11 novembre 2019

 

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The Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law and the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism, with the support of the McGill Refugee Research Group, welcome Professor Jane McAdam, University of New South Wales Law, Sydney, Australia ; Director of the Andrew & Renata Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law ; and Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Refugee Law journal.

In refugee law, the meaning of ‘well-founded fear of being persecuted’ has been extensively examined by courts and scholars alike. Yet, there has been very little consideration of how far into the future a risk of persecution may extend for protection to be warranted.

This lack of guidance on the question of timing has allowed an inappropriate notion of ‘imminence’ to infiltrate refugee decision-making across a range of jurisdictions – at times resulting in people being denied protection. It is especially pertinent to human rights-based claims involving harms that may manifest more gradually over time, such as those relating to the slow-onset impacts of climate change.

Professor McAdam’s talk examines how certain courts have grappled with ‘time’ in a relatively nuanced way, highlighting principles that may be instructive for other contexts.

Workplace Sexual Harassment : Assessing the Effectiveness of Human Rights Law in Canada

9 octobre 2019

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Professor Bethany Hastie, LLM’12, DCL’15, Peter A. Allard School of Law (UBC), will give a talk on her published research report analyzing workplace sexual harassment complaints under human rights law. Hosted by the Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law.

Sparked by the #MeToo movement, social commentary and media have revived broad-based discussions concerning sexual harassment and misconduct in contemporary workplaces. Evidence suggests that legal claims concerning sexual harassment and misconduct are increasingly being pursued through human rights tribunals. However, there is reason for concern that the increasingly documented issues attending victims of sexual assault and gender-based violence in the criminal justice system may arise in complaints of sexual harassment under human rights law as well. This lecture draws on a report that analyzed substantive decisions on the merits concerning workplace sexual harassment at each of the BC and Ontario Human Rights Tribunals from 2000-2018, with a view to identifying how the law of sexual harassment is understood, interpreted and applied by the Tribunals’ adjudicators. In particular, this lecture focuses on demonstrating how gender-based stereotypes and myths known to occur in criminal justice proceedings arise in the human rights context for sexual harassment complainants.

About the speaker

Bethany Hastie is an Assistant Professor at the Peter Allard School of Law at UBC. She holds a DCL and LLM from McGill University and a JD from UBC. Bethany’s research examines precarious labour in the intersection spaces of human rights, immigration, and labour and employment law. Her recently completed report, “Workplace Sexual Harassment : Assessing the Effectiveness of Human Rights Law in Canada” was completed with funding from the Canadian Bar Association Law for the Future Fund. Her work on sexual harassment law is forthcoming in the Canadian Journal of Women and the Law, and has been presented in academic and practice settings across Canada.

 

Mea Culpa, Sua Culpa, Tua Maxima Culpa

Collective Responsibility and Legal Judgment in the Context of Crimes against Humanity - Oct 07, 2019
7 octobre 2019

 

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A talk by Professor Nergis Canefe

Professor Nergis Canefe (Associate Professor, Center for Refugee Studies, Osgoode Hall Law School) delivered a talk at McGill, on the invitation of the Oppenheimer Chair and the CHRLP, revisiting the Nuremberg legacy from the perspective of collective responsibility and culpability. Due to the extensive the nature of harm involved in historic injustices, Professor Canefe posits that individual responsibility argument waged against historic justice claims carries forward a great deficit. Historic injustices and the harms they generate are best understood as collective harms. The response to such harms must have a collective component as well, and the remedies offered are only meaningful in a social and political context.

One common form of such harm, constitutive harm, significantly differs from the aggregative accounts of harm generally used by standard individual criminal litigation processes. It is the type of harm that people suffer as members of historically wronged groups and communities and often in the hands of the state that was poised to protect them. Therefore, historic injustice cases require a different account of responsibility, one that cannot be harnessed solely based on individual responsibility argumentation within the context of domestic or international criminal justice jurisprudence.

Her article urges that we make room for considerations pertaining to collective responsibility as a moral obligation, thus providing a context within which legal judgment for egregious crimes could be firmly situated and historicized.

About the speaker

Nergis Canefe is a scholar trained in the fields of Political Philosophy, Forced Migration Studies and International Public Law with special focus on Human Rights and state-society relations. She has over twenty years of experience in carrying out in-depth qualitative research with displaced communities and teaching human rights and public law globally. Her research experience includes working with the Muslim and Jewish Diasporas in Europe and North America, refugees and displaced peoples in Turkey, Cyprus, India, Uganda, South Africa, Bosnia and Colombia. national association for the study of forced migration).

Date : 7 Oct, 2019 Location : New Chancellor Day Hall Stephen Scott Seminar Room (OCDH 16), 3644 rue Peel, Montreal, QC, H3A 1W9, CA

 

30 Years Of Child Rights : Progress And Challenges

Sept 20, 2019

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Organised by the IBCR and McGill University Faculty of Law, co sponsored by the CHRLP and Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law (Francois Crepeau). This conference gathered internationally renowned experts in the field of children’s rights and with the exceptional participation of Najat Maalla M’jid, the United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General on violence against children.

The panel reviewed the progress made since the creation of the CRC 30 years ago and discuss current matters and situations to assess the achievements and challenges still pending regarding children’s rights worldwide.

https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/billets-30-years-of-child-rights-progress-and-challenges-71653021115#